Industry Workshops: Atlanta

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Jari Vikstedt, Allen Henley
ETS-Lindgren, LitePoint
313/314
Abstract

5GNR technology presents unique challenges to device manufacturers to not only find the room where to place the chipset, but also to ensure they perform as intended - in all the possible usage cases. This requires more validation testing at the design level prior to releasing prototypes for mass production. Production line testing lowers the risk of missing a company’s time-to-market and budget goals. In this workshop, we will review testing of 5GNR mmWave devices, and help attendees visualize why performance validation testing is required in all steps of the design process from the chipset level to production line testing.

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Garth D'Abreu, Ross Carlton
ETS-Lindgren
313/314
Abstract

Achieving electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) for 5G devices is dependent upon the existence of achievable and appropriate regulatory requirements along with meaningful test methods for demonstrating compliance. The primary body in North America focused on developing EMC test methods for wireless and 5G devices, for both licensed and unlicensed transmitters, is Accredited Standards Committee C63 of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). This workshop will begin with an overview of C63 and the standards most relevant to manufacturers of 5G mmWave devices. The overview will be followed by presentations focused on wireless coexistence and transmitter performance characterization and validation.

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Joel Dunsmore
Keysight Technologies
313/314
Abstract

Active Antenna Arrays will be widely used in new 5G and Internet-from-Space applications. As such their non-linear performance and its effect on EVM, a key metric of communications performance, becomes important. This workshop details new methods for characterizing the EVM of active antennas using an Over-the-Air (OTA) method, which can show EVM performance of the antenna, including EVM effects of the beam steering, and for the first time showing the element-by-element contribution of the array providing an EVM scan of the array.  This scan, which is normally not possible due to signal-to-noise limitations of tradition test methods, utilizes a VNA EVM measurement method. A direct comparison to measurements using high-performance spectrum-analyzers  and VSA demodulation is presented, demonstrating an exact equivalence.